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Thursday, May 6
 

6:30pm PDT

Caring for the Souls of Black Folk: Narrative Spirituality and Care As a Response to Racial Trauma
The objective of this workshop is to explore with participants how narrative can be used as a tool of listening to, learning about and creating new narratives of care, counseling, connection and community across difference. As a result of participation in this workshop, participants will understand the importance of learning about the story of those who they care for with the understanding that when we learn more fully about each other’s story and the fuller story of our nation, we can reframe our own understanding and bias leading to a better community founded on collaboration and cross racial dialogue and care. 
 
As a result of this workshop, participants will: 
  • Learn about the history of American race relations and its impact on the racial trauma of black  
people.  
  • Examine the legacy of racial narratives and biases in race relations.  
  • Engage narrative and story as a tool of cross-cultural spiritual care and counseling. 
  • Explore the concept of re-storying and the role it can play in reshaping race relations. 
  • Be introduced to practices of “Re-story” as a tool to help transform the dominant narratives that  
     shape their own practices of spiritual care and counseling.  

 

Speakers

Thursday May 6, 2021 6:30pm - 8:00pm PDT
Session 1

6:30pm PDT

El Idioma: Dolor y Esperanza/Language: Grief and Hope
With over 50 million Spanish speakers, the United States has the second largest Spanish-speaking population in the world after Mexico, surpassing Spain itself.1  By 2050, the US will surpass Mexico, and become the country with the largest speaking Spanish population in the world.  Yet Spanish-speakers in the US encounter language prejudice and discrimination in the broader culture and unfortunately with more dire consequences in the healthcare setting.  As ACPE Certified Educators, native-Spanish speakers, heritage language speakers, second-language speakers, we want to address the grief and hope that emanates from our experience in the 2021 ACPE National Conference “Creating Room to Breathe”—making room to speak, adding our voice in the midst of malaise, violence, and social fragmentation.    
  
We, the Latinx/Hispanic Spanish-Speaking Community of Practice want to share our expertise based on our collective experience of language discrimination and linguistic bias.  We believe that our experience can help ACPE Educators and ACPE Psychotherapists address the ethnic, racial, cultural differences they encounter with their English-as-a Second-Language students/supervisees.  Consequently, this workshop will:  
  • Present vignettes of personal journeys of Latinx Educators through the ACPE Certification Process.    
  • Outline the emotional and spiritual importance of a persons’ native language,   
  • Illustrate the trauma of segregation or less-than categorization based on English proficiency and accent, and   
  • Propose possible supervisory interventions that would be helpful when working with students/supervisees from this background.    
 

Speakers

Thursday May 6, 2021 6:30pm - 8:00pm PDT

6:30pm PDT

In Thought, Word and Deed: Anti-Racism as Spiritual Practice
Just like different forms of racism work in tandem with each other to reinforce racist ideas, behaviors, systems, and policy, anti-racism and the active and conscious effort to dismantle racism also takes many forms. In the midst of its varying forms in contemporary society, what would it be like to frame the work of anti-racism as a daily spiritual practice?   
  
Using clinical case examples and Ibram Kendi’s book, How to be an Anti-Racist as a starting point, this workshop will explore the concept of anti-racism from both a theological and psychological perspective and will frame the work of anti-racism as a daily spiritual discipline. Specifically, this workshop will utilize Cognitive Behavior Theory and Thomistic Theology’s concept of habitus to examine the unconscious, covert, unintentional aspects of racism; consider the relationship between thoughts, behaviors, and emotions in the work of anti-racism; and suggest spiritual practices that cultivate anti-racist lives and identities.   
   
As a result of participating in this workshop, participants will:  
  • Understand the unconscious, covert unintentional aspects of racism  
  • Consider how Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Thomistic Theology’s concept of habitus can be helpful frameworks for understanding and addressing the unconscious, covert, unintentional aspects of racism.  
  • Explore spiritual practices that cultivate anti-racist lives and identities. 

Speakers

Thursday May 6, 2021 6:30pm - 8:00pm PDT

6:30pm PDT

Inhaling our Histories: Exhaling Untruths
Past racial bias in constructing history is examined by a group of women with 2020 vision - looking back at what is recorded in mainline textbooks, examining the current climate, and anticipating future impact.  ACPE has long been aware of the importance of a client’s, counselee’s, patient’s individual \history.  Family systems has helped with understanding the impact of generational transmission, the role of the individual’s extended and ancestral familial history.   
 
This panel will unfold, from their research and experience, the repercussions of one’s cultural history.  These panelists are theologians working as CPE supervisors, ministers, leaders of relief organizations, teaching faculty and one Bishop. They represent Asian-American, Native American, African American, Italian American, and Caucasian American women. The panel draws from their recent collaborative work, Women with 2020 Vision: American Theologians on the Vote, Voice, and Vision of Women (Fortress Press, 2020). Their findings and applications address ethnic/racial/cultural histories that cause us to gasp and gulp for intake of fresh air. 
 
Objectives: 
  • Addressing racial/ethnic/cultural biases in mainline “history” 

  • Connecting these biases to an individual’s psycho-social development 
  • Educating supervisors and mentors about the impact of these historical biases in clinical training 
  • Brainstorming proactively in making our CPE centers  conduits of fresh air 


Thursday May 6, 2021 6:30pm - 8:00pm PDT

6:30pm PDT

Lift Every Voice and Teach: Including African American Voices in CPE Curriculum Development
This workshop will provide Certified Educators, Certified Educator Candidates, and Counselors with personality, theology and education theories that exist beyond traditional, Eurocentric and commonly used theories drawn upon in the training and educational environment.  Attendees will be presented with a vast array of theories, theorists and resources that can be integrated to connect with the African American experience in the education space. 
  
Objectives: 
  • To explore the importance of including African American voices and perspectives in the Clinical Pastoral Education certification process 
  • To present a framework for theology, personality and education theory integration which is rooted in African American voices and perspectives 
  • To provide an inventory of theology, personality and education theories, theorists and resources that reflect African American voices and perspectives 
  
Outcomes:  

Practitioners of Clinical Pastoral Education, Clinical Counseling, Counseling Education, Mental Health Providers and Professional Counselors will: 
  • Gain awareness of the importance of including African American voices and perspectives in the CPE certification process 
  • Have increased knowledge of personality, theology and education theories/theorists that reflect African American voices and perspectives 

Speakers

Thursday May 6, 2021 6:30pm - 8:00pm PDT

6:30pm PDT

Spiritual Care + Domestic Violence + Pandemics: Emerging Insights on Sensitivities to Race, Tradition, and Gender
This workshop will feature film series excerpts from recently released HEALING THE HEALERS Preparing and Supporting Faith Leaders: Domestic Violence, as well as a panel discussion with spiritual care providers featured in, or contributing to, the episodes and accompanying written guides.  Though domestic abuse is not a new topic for mental health and spiritual care professionals, updated multimedia resources for faith leaders with more contemporary sensitivities to race, religious tradition, and gender expression are scarce.  In addition to the COVID-19 dynamics of social and fiscal isolation resulting in compounding pandemics for anyone experiencing domestic violence, what should counselors, clinicians, and caregivers keep in mind when providing care in contexts that attend to spiritual and religious components?

Workshop learning objectives: 

  • Learners will be equipped with emerging, updated tools for anyone providing care and counseling from a faith perspective for victims of domestic violence.  
  • Learners will acquire insights as to common uses and misuses of sacred texts and religious traditions in providing care for victims of domestic violence, including examination of complex issues surrounding gender, power, violence, forgiveness and accountability. 
  • Learners will generate localized, context-sensitive “contact lists”, identifying strengths in gaps in their understanding of how to liaison with appropriate local professionals (law enforcement, domestic violence advocates). 
  • Learners will be equipped with best care practices sensitive to racialized health disparities and the disproportionate impact domestic violence has on communities of color.   

About HEALING THE HEALERS Preparing and Supporting Faith Leaders: Domestic Violence: This timely video series includes 4 episodes of filmed peer-to-peer conversations between faith leaders sensitively navigating the complexities surrounding domestic violence and faith.  Each episode encourages faith leaders and spiritual care providers with strategies for cultivating safe houses of worship and care contexts for victims and survivors, highlighting the dynamics of race, gender, and faith traditions.  Featured faith leaders include survivors of domestic violence, and leaders with experience constructing systemic care solutions for all affected.  A written guide accompanies the series, produced in partnership with leading experts and organizations.  This series brings emerging insights and themed care strategies to every leader, educator or care provider responding to domestic violence.  

Project partners include the FaithTrust Institute, Peaceful Families Project, CONNECT NYC, Soul 2 Soul Sisters, and Safe Haven.  Accompanying written guide includes a diverse array of experts in pastoral care, as well as ACPE Outcomes + APC Competencies tagging, supporting chaplaincy education uses.


Thursday May 6, 2021 6:30pm - 8:00pm PDT

6:30pm PDT

The Role of Chaplains in Liberating Medicine from its Legacy of Systemic Racism in the Era of COVID-19
Systemic Racism and Unconscious Bias are stark realities that impact the spiritual, emotional, psycho-social and physical well-being of ethnic and racial minorities in our society. If the role of the professional chaplain in healthcare settings is to provide support for the spiritual, emotional and social well-being of patients, caregivers and staff as they navigate the healthcare system, then chaplains must be aware of and responsive to the impact of unconscious bias and systemic racism on the communities they serve. The Covid-19 Pandemic and the public outcry for social justice during this Summer’s season of outrage and discontent has exposed the urgency for informed and prepared chaplains to respond.  
  
In 2018, 140 chaplains from across the country participated in a 26 question survey that was designed to gauge their understanding of their role and their preparedness to effectively support minority groups who encounter bias, racism and/or racist systems. Their responses provide a wealth of information and insight into the challenges chaplains confront in fostering supportive environments and undergirding spiritual resiliency.  This workshop incorporates their insights with a comprehensive exploration of the history that informs present day practice and patient experience. It combines historical analysis, thought provoking research and clinical vignettes in an effort to engage and empower chaplains to better serve their patients of color during the Era of Covid-19.  
 

Speakers

Thursday May 6, 2021 6:30pm - 8:00pm PDT

6:30pm PDT

Trauma Informed Spiritual Care:  A Curriculum for Those Caring for First Responders 
This workshop will focus on the curriculum developed for the Baltimore City Police Department Community Chaplains.  It will provide information about the curriculum development process as well as summaries of the educational modules.  Understanding trauma is a key to trauma informed spiritual care, therefore, the workshop will provide information about this theory including childhood trauma, racialized trauma and generational trauma through families and systems.  

Speakers

Thursday May 6, 2021 6:30pm - 8:00pm PDT

6:30pm PDT

Understanding and Working with Race-based Trauma in Counseling and Spiritual Care
Clinical cases and empirical research demonstrate evidence of long-term mental health effects of racism and discrimination (Carter & Sant-Baret, 2015;  ). Known by several names--cultural, historical, intergeneration, and transgenerational trauma—the exact meaning of these terms and presumed mechanisms of transmission differ. The terms and mechanisms will be examined in light of research on trauma among Comfort Women in Korea, post-Apartheid South Africa, Native Americans, Cambodians, and African Americans. Practical applications of existing measurements of race-based trauma and evidence-based trauma-informed therapeutic techniques will be explored for clinicians, especially spiritually integrated psychotherapy and spiritual care. Particular attention will be paid to the experiences of people of color who experience the effects of both historical trauma and ongoing racism.  

An abundance of research suggests that while negative symptoms of trauma such as PTSD are real, enduring extreme stress and moving through extreme stress can have positive psychological consequences that are also real. The most widely recognized term used to describe the phenomena is posttraumatic growth (PTG; Calhoun & Tedeschi, 2006), with other terms such as stress-related growth (SRG; Parks, 2002) also used to describe the process. The PTG literature highlights that the act of enduring stress or trauma can set a person on a quest for meaning that encourages a major reconstruction of her global assumptions. This can result in the transformation of a person’s experience of herself, others, or the world. There is limited research emerging in the area of race-based trauma, posttraumatic growth, and resilience. This research and clinical examples will be explored with participants.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and distinguish types of cross-generational traumatic symptoms.
  • Summarize proposed mechanisms of cross-generational trauma
  • Locate and apply race-based stress symptom assessments and techniques in clinical settings
  • Recognize evidence of resiliency and Post-traumatic Growth despite ongoing interpersonal and institutional racism.


Thursday May 6, 2021 6:30pm - 8:00pm PDT

6:30pm PDT

Womanist Approaches to Decolonizing Practices of Care
Participants will engage womanist approaches to theologies and practices of care and counseling in light of their decolonial aims.  The workshop format will be didactic and participatory. We will focus our attention on the development of three capacities necessary for undertaking decolonial cares:
  • Defining womanist approaches to care
  • Articulating their decolonial aims
  • Examining 3 examples of womanist approaches to decolonizing care from different care contexts

Participants will be able to 
  • Define womanist care and counseling in terms of theological, culture analyses, and practice aims
  • Articulate criteria for a womanist decolonial approach to defining and practicing care and counseling
  • Critically evaluate practices of care from a womanist decolonial perspective
  • Critical analyze theologies of care and counseling in relation to decolonial commitments.

Speakers

Thursday May 6, 2021 6:30pm - 8:00pm PDT

6:30pm PDT

“Let America Be American Again”: Exploring the Relationship between Psychological Ambivalence and Social Oppression
Strictly defined, ambivalence refers to the simultaneous existence of contradictory feelings and attitudes toward a person, object, event, situation or the self. From a psychological perspective, unresolved ambivalence can result in crucial elements of the self being relegated indefinitely to the status of unheard through ongoing cognitive, emotional, and spiritual repression. On a larger scale, the struggles of ideological ambivalence and social oppression echo these psychological conflicts.  
  
This workshop offers a reading of Langston Hughes 1936 poem, “Let America Be America Again” as a framework through which the relationship between social and psychological ambivalence can be explored. By understanding the unheard in Hughes’s poem as parenthetical voices rather than conflicting ideological evaluations, we can allow space for the unheard to exist as both individual psychological manifestations and collective social manifestations. Within this framework, not only are we able to draw connections between microcosmic and macrocosmic occurrences of ambivalence, but begin to understand these more universally - not as isolated instances of cognitive and social conflict, but rather as individual and communal bodies sharing experiences of ongoing oppression within systems of neurological and political power.  
  
 Learning Objectives  
  • Examine modern psychological definitions of ambivalence  
  • Consider ambivalence as oppression of the unheard rather than the conflict of opposites.  
  • Recognize that ambivalence as oppression exists in both psychological and social bodies.  
  • Establish a therapeutic framework that addresses the psychological, spiritual, and social aspects of ambivalence.  
  • Provide resources for further learning on Liberation Psychology, oppression, and systems of power.  

Speakers

Thursday May 6, 2021 6:30pm - 8:00pm PDT
 
Monday, May 10
 

3:30pm PDT

Beyond White Privilege – Empathy and Understanding
The brutal killing of George Floyd, coupled with the recent invasion of the Capital building by Trump supporters, has forced many white Americans to be conscious of stark disparities in racial justice for the first time.  How could we white Americans be so clueless for so long? What social structures have kept many of us cocooned in ignorance while our fellow Black, Brown, Asian, Moslem and Indian neighbors suffered? What is it about white privilege that prevents us from seeing what is right before our eyes?  
 
Beginning with my own story of moving from ignorance to dawning awareness as a middle-class white woman, I will invite my fellow white Americans to consider the ways that white Americans have historically participated in “blaming the victim”, beginning with the genocide of Indigenous peoples and the subjugation of Black Americans through chattel slavery.  
 
Workshop participants will be invited to consider these questions: How do we move beyond guilt and superficial solidarity to meaningful action for social justice? How do we reach out to our white brothers and sisters who may still be Trump supporters or at least not “woke”?  How do we continue to educate ourselves to prepare for the day when America’s color line while be erased once and for all? What do #BlackLivesMatter, #MeToo and other movements for social justice have in common? How can we best promote empathy for “the other” – those unlike us?  


Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Session 2

3:30pm PDT

Caring for the Souls of Black Folk: Narrative Spirituality and Care As a Response to Racial Trauma
The objective of this workshop is to explore with participants how narrative can be used as a tool of listening to, learning about and creating new narratives of care, counseling, connection and community across difference. As a result of participation in this workshop, participants will understand the importance of learning about the story of those who they care for with the understanding that when we learn more fully about each other’s story and the fuller story of our nation, we can reframe our own understanding and bias leading to a better community founded on collaboration and cross racial dialogue and care. 
 
As a result of this workshop, participants will: 
  • Learn about the history of American race relations and its impact on the racial trauma of black  
people.  
  • Examine the legacy of racial narratives and biases in race relations.  
  • Engage narrative and story as a tool of cross-cultural spiritual care and counseling. 
  • Explore the concept of re-storying and the role it can play in reshaping race relations. 
  • Be introduced to practices of “Re-story” as a tool to help transform the dominant narratives that  
     shape their own practices of spiritual care and counseling.  

 

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

El Idioma: Dolor y Esperanza/Language: Grief and Hope
With over 50 million Spanish speakers, the United States has the second largest Spanish-speaking population in the world after Mexico, surpassing Spain itself.1  By 2050, the US will surpass Mexico, and become the country with the largest speaking Spanish population in the world.  Yet Spanish-speakers in the US encounter language prejudice and discrimination in the broader culture and unfortunately with more dire consequences in the healthcare setting.  As ACPE Certified Educators, native-Spanish speakers, heritage language speakers, second-language speakers, we want to address the grief and hope that emanates from our experience in the 2021 ACPE National Conference “Creating Room to Breathe”—making room to speak, adding our voice in the midst of malaise, violence, and social fragmentation.    
  
We, the Latinx/Hispanic Spanish-Speaking Community of Practice want to share our expertise based on our collective experience of language discrimination and linguistic bias.  We believe that our experience can help ACPE Educators and ACPE Psychotherapists address the ethnic, racial, cultural differences they encounter with their English-as-a Second-Language students/supervisees.  Consequently, this workshop will:  
  • Present vignettes of personal journeys of Latinx Educators through the ACPE Certification Process.    
  • Outline the emotional and spiritual importance of a persons’ native language,   
  • Illustrate the trauma of segregation or less-than categorization based on English proficiency and accent, and   
  • Propose possible supervisory interventions that would be helpful when working with students/supervisees from this background.    
 

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Historic Trauma, Implicit Bias and CPE Strategies in Light of the COVID-19 Pandemic in Native American Communities
The Covid-19 pandemic, state sanctioned violence, and social division have a higher incidence in communities of color. This is true in Native American communities.  The workshop will demonstrate how the higher incidence of Covid-19 virus has affected Native communities in eastern Montana and steps taken to help healthcare providers, in general, and CPE/counseling students, specifically, to better understand this dynamic.  
  
This will be a two-part track workshop, attendance at both sessions is highly recommended. The first presentation will address historical and present-day issues of racism within the Native experience. The second presentation will address the challenges for Clinical Pastoral Education in light of the Covid-19 pandemic in eastern Montana.  
  
The outcomes of the presentations are:    
  • Outline the bi as faced by Native American patients in healthcare settings  
  • Illustrate the disparate impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic in Native American communities in eastern Montana  
  • Demonstrate strategies for educating CPE students and other counseling/care providers on how  to care for persons with Native American religious, cultural, racial/ethnic diversities in Montana in the context of these recent health disparities.   


Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

In Thought, Word and Deed: Anti-Racism as Spiritual Practice
Just like different forms of racism work in tandem with each other to reinforce racist ideas, behaviors, systems, and policy, anti-racism and the active and conscious effort to dismantle racism also takes many forms. In the midst of its varying forms in contemporary society, what would it be like to frame the work of anti-racism as a daily spiritual practice?   
  
Using clinical case examples and Ibram Kendi’s book, How to be an Anti-Racist as a starting point, this workshop will explore the concept of anti-racism from both a theological and psychological perspective and will frame the work of anti-racism as a daily spiritual discipline. Specifically, this workshop will utilize Cognitive Behavior Theory and Thomistic Theology’s concept of habitus to examine the unconscious, covert, unintentional aspects of racism; consider the relationship between thoughts, behaviors, and emotions in the work of anti-racism; and suggest spiritual practices that cultivate anti-racist lives and identities.   
   
As a result of participating in this workshop, participants will:  
  • Understand the unconscious, covert unintentional aspects of racism  
  • Consider how Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Thomistic Theology’s concept of habitus can be helpful frameworks for understanding and addressing the unconscious, covert, unintentional aspects of racism.  
  • Explore spiritual practices that cultivate anti-racist lives and identities. 

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Inhaling our Histories: Exhaling Untruths
Past racial bias in constructing history is examined by a group of women with 2020 vision - looking back at what is recorded in mainline textbooks, examining the current climate, and anticipating future impact.  ACPE has long been aware of the importance of a client’s, counselee’s, patient’s individual \history.  Family systems has helped with understanding the impact of generational transmission, the role of the individual’s extended and ancestral familial history.   
 
This panel will unfold, from their research and experience, the repercussions of one’s cultural history.  These panelists are theologians working as CPE supervisors, ministers, leaders of relief organizations, teaching faculty and one Bishop. They represent Asian-American, Native American, African American, Italian American, and Caucasian American women. The panel draws from their recent collaborative work, Women with 2020 Vision: American Theologians on the Vote, Voice, and Vision of Women (Fortress Press, 2020). Their findings and applications address ethnic/racial/cultural histories that cause us to gasp and gulp for intake of fresh air. 
 
Objectives: 
  • Addressing racial/ethnic/cultural biases in mainline “history” 
  • Connecting these biases to an individual’s psycho-social development 
  • Educating supervisors and mentors about the impact of these historical biases in clinical training 
  • Brainstorming proactively in making our CPE centers  conduits of fresh air 


Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Lift Every Voice and Teach: Including African American Voices in CPE Curriculum Development
This workshop will provide Certified Educators, Certified Educator Candidates, and Counselors with personality, theology and education theories that exist beyond traditional, Eurocentric and commonly used theories drawn upon in the training and educational environment.  Attendees will be presented with a vast array of theories, theorists and resources that can be integrated to connect with the African American experience in the education space. 
  
Objectives: 
  • To explore the importance of including African American voices and perspectives in the Clinical Pastoral Education certification process 
  • To present a framework for theology, personality and education theory integration which is rooted in African American voices and perspectives 
  • To provide an inventory of theology, personality and education theories, theorists and resources that reflect African American voices and perspectives 
  
Outcomes:  

Practitioners of Clinical Pastoral Education, Clinical Counseling, Counseling Education, Mental Health Providers and Professional Counselors will: 
  • Gain awareness of the importance of including African American voices and perspectives in the CPE certification process 
  • Have increased knowledge of personality, theology and education theories/theorists that reflect African American voices and perspectives 

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Reviving the Breath of Life: The Lament as Restorative Therapy
Authentic self-identity has been compromised in the psyche of Black people in America. The denigrating effects of stigmatizing responses and internalized biases have deposited ideas of shame and belittling self-concepts within the consciousness of Black people. These negative self-perceptions have hindered the development of authentic Black selfhood and require attention, so that these individuals can be liberated from the oppressive existence and realize restoration to genuine expression as a viable living soul. 

This workshop invites participants to consider the mental health concerns of those in the Black community and seeks to outline ways to assist individuals who experience the negative impact of these internalized faulty self-perceptions.  In particular, the biblical concept of lament will be introduced as a pathway to discover and grieve the hindering self-perceptions that exist in the psyche of Black people. Through lecture, role plays, and small group discussion this workshop will: 
  • Demonstrate the necessity of lamenting the customarily injurious, invalidating, and discriminatory environments and treatment of Black people 
  • Outline the literary structure of biblical lament and utilize it as a means of creating resistance, strength, support, and new possibilities in the minds, souls, and lives of Black people. 
  • Explore the ways in which implicit and explicit bias impacts the care and mental health treatment of Black people. 
  • Invite and encourage participants to cultivate an empathic presence for those seeking liberation from oppressive structures.  


Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Spiritual Care + Domestic Violence + Pandemics: Emerging Insights on Sensitivities to Race, Tradition, and Gender
This workshop will feature film series excerpts from recently released HEALING THE HEALERS Preparing and Supporting Faith Leaders: Domestic Violence, as well as a panel discussion with spiritual care providers featured in, or contributing to, the episodes and accompanying written guides.  Though domestic abuse is not a new topic for mental health and spiritual care professionals, updated multimedia resources for faith leaders with more contemporary sensitivities to race, religious tradition, and gender expression are scarce.  In addition to the COVID-19 dynamics of social and fiscal isolation resulting in compounding pandemics for anyone experiencing domestic violence, what should counselors, clinicians, and caregivers keep in mind when providing care in contexts that attend to spiritual and religious components?

Workshop learning objectives: 

  • Learners will be equipped with emerging, updated tools for anyone providing care and counseling from a faith perspective for victims of domestic violence.  
  • Learners will acquire insights as to common uses and misuses of sacred texts and religious traditions in providing care for victims of domestic violence, including examination of complex issues surrounding gender, power, violence, forgiveness and accountability. 
  • Learners will generate localized, context-sensitive “contact lists”, identifying strengths in gaps in their understanding of how to liaison with appropriate local professionals (law enforcement, domestic violence advocates). 
  • Learners will be equipped with best care practices sensitive to racialized health disparities and the disproportionate impact domestic violence has on communities of color.   

About HEALING THE HEALERS Preparing and Supporting Faith Leaders: Domestic Violence: This timely video series includes 4 episodes of filmed peer-to-peer conversations between faith leaders sensitively navigating the complexities surrounding domestic violence and faith.  Each episode encourages faith leaders and spiritual care providers with strategies for cultivating safe houses of worship and care contexts for victims and survivors, highlighting the dynamics of race, gender, and faith traditions.  Featured faith leaders include survivors of domestic violence, and leaders with experience constructing systemic care solutions for all affected.  A written guide accompanies the series, produced in partnership with leading experts and organizations.  This series brings emerging insights and themed care strategies to every leader, educator or care provider responding to domestic violence.  

Project partners include the FaithTrust Institute, Peaceful Families Project, CONNECT NYC, Soul 2 Soul Sisters, and Safe Haven.  Accompanying written guide includes a diverse array of experts in pastoral care, as well as ACPE Outcomes + APC Competencies tagging, supporting chaplaincy education uses.


Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

The Role of Chaplains in Liberating Medicine from its Legacy of Systemic Racism in the Era of COVID-19
Systemic Racism and Unconscious Bias are stark realities that impact the spiritual, emotional, psycho-social and physical well-being of ethnic and racial minorities in our society. If the role of the professional chaplain in healthcare settings is to provide support for the spiritual, emotional and social well-being of patients, caregivers and staff as they navigate the healthcare system, then chaplains must be aware of and responsive to the impact of unconscious bias and systemic racism on the communities they serve. The Covid-19 Pandemic and the public outcry for social justice during this Summer’s season of outrage and discontent has exposed the urgency for informed and prepared chaplains to respond.  
  
In 2018, 140 chaplains from across the country participated in a 26 question survey that was designed to gauge their understanding of their role and their preparedness to effectively support minority groups who encounter bias, racism and/or racist systems. Their responses provide a wealth of information and insight into the challenges chaplains confront in fostering supportive environments and undergirding spiritual resiliency.  This workshop incorporates their insights with a comprehensive exploration of the history that informs present day practice and patient experience. It combines historical analysis, thought provoking research and clinical vignettes in an effort to engage and empower chaplains to better serve their patients of color during the Era of Covid-19.  
 

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Trauma Informed Spiritual Care:  A Curriculum for Those Caring for First Responders 
This workshop will focus on the curriculum developed for the Baltimore City Police Department Community Chaplains.  It will provide information about the curriculum development process as well as summaries of the educational modules.  Understanding trauma is a key to trauma informed spiritual care, therefore, the workshop will provide information about this theory including childhood trauma, racialized trauma and generational trauma through families and systems.  

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Understanding and Working with Race-based Trauma in Counseling and Spiritual Care
Clinical cases and empirical research demonstrate evidence of long-term mental health effects of racism and discrimination (Carter & Sant-Baret, 2015;  ). Known by several names--cultural, historical, intergeneration, and transgenerational trauma—the exact meaning of these terms and presumed mechanisms of transmission differ. The terms and mechanisms will be examined in light of research on trauma among Comfort Women in Korea, post-Apartheid South Africa, Native Americans, Cambodians, and African Americans. Practical applications of existing measurements of race-based trauma and evidence-based trauma-informed therapeutic techniques will be explored for clinicians, especially spiritually integrated psychotherapy and spiritual care. Particular attention will be paid to the experiences of people of color who experience the effects of both historical trauma and ongoing racism.  

An abundance of research suggests that while negative symptoms of trauma such as PTSD are real, enduring extreme stress and moving through extreme stress can have positive psychological consequences that are also real. The most widely recognized term used to describe the phenomena is posttraumatic growth (PTG; Calhoun & Tedeschi, 2006), with other terms such as stress-related growth (SRG; Parks, 2002) also used to describe the process. The PTG literature highlights that the act of enduring stress or trauma can set a person on a quest for meaning that encourages a major reconstruction of her global assumptions. This can result in the transformation of a person’s experience of herself, others, or the world. There is limited research emerging in the area of race-based trauma, posttraumatic growth, and resilience. This research and clinical examples will be explored with participants.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and distinguish types of cross-generational traumatic symptoms.
  • Summarize proposed mechanisms of cross-generational trauma
  • Locate and apply race-based stress symptom assessments and techniques in clinical settings
  • Recognize evidence of resiliency and Post-traumatic Growth despite ongoing interpersonal and institutional racism.


Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Womanist Approaches to Decolonizing Practices of Care
Participants will engage womanist approaches to theologies and practices of care and counseling in light of their decolonial aims.  The workshop format will be didactic and participatory. We will focus our attention on the development of three capacities necessary for undertaking decolonial cares:
  • Defining womanist approaches to care
  • Articulating their decolonial aims
  • Examining 3 examples of womanist approaches to decolonizing care from different care contexts

Participants will be able to 
  • Define womanist care and counseling in terms of theological, culture analyses, and practice aims
  • Articulate criteria for a womanist decolonial approach to defining and practicing care and counseling
  • Critically evaluate practices of care from a womanist decolonial perspective
  • Critical analyze theologies of care and counseling in relation to decolonial commitments.

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

“Let America Be American Again”: Exploring the Relationship between Psychological Ambivalence and Social Oppression
Strictly defined, ambivalence refers to the simultaneous existence of contradictory feelings and attitudes toward a person, object, event, situation or the self. From a psychological perspective, unresolved ambivalence can result in crucial elements of the self being relegated indefinitely to the status of unheard through ongoing cognitive, emotional, and spiritual repression. On a larger scale, the struggles of ideological ambivalence and social oppression echo these psychological conflicts.  
  
This workshop offers a reading of Langston Hughes 1936 poem, “Let America Be America Again” as a framework through which the relationship between social and psychological ambivalence can be explored. By understanding the unheard in Hughes’s poem as parenthetical voices rather than conflicting ideological evaluations, we can allow space for the unheard to exist as both individual psychological manifestations and collective social manifestations. Within this framework, not only are we able to draw connections between microcosmic and macrocosmic occurrences of ambivalence, but begin to understand these more universally - not as isolated instances of cognitive and social conflict, but rather as individual and communal bodies sharing experiences of ongoing oppression within systems of neurological and political power.  
  
 Learning Objectives  
  • Examine modern psychological definitions of ambivalence  
  • Consider ambivalence as oppression of the unheard rather than the conflict of opposites.  
  • Recognize that ambivalence as oppression exists in both psychological and social bodies.  
  • Establish a therapeutic framework that addresses the psychological, spiritual, and social aspects of ambivalence.  
  • Provide resources for further learning on Liberation Psychology, oppression, and systems of power.  

Speakers

Monday May 10, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
 
Tuesday, May 11
 

7:30pm PDT

Breaking Down Barriers to Access Palliative Spiritual Care Education
A majority of clergy, counselors , and religious leaders acknowledge that they and their clients and congregants could benefit from greater familiarity with realities in palliative and end-of-life care.1 The skills and expertise of palliative care, including advance care planning and goals of care, are even more in demand in the time of COVID-19.  There also exist significant disparities in access to palliative care for patients, with regard to race, ethnicity , and nation of origin.2   In parallel, socio-economic barriers for engaging in CPE persist.  A disproportionate number of clergy, counselors , and religious leaders of color lack the resources to devote themselves to CPE full-time, and even part-time programs and internships may be out of reach.     
  
This presentation will present curriculum, strategic partnerships, and lessons learned from a two-year pilot palliative care specialty CPE program.  This program has been aimed at breaking down barriers to participation and building meaningful partnerships between diverse religious leaders and palliative care clinicians. Can removing obstacles to spiritual care/counseling education lead to overcoming barriers to quality palliative care?  Do patients experience better outcomes if their own diversity is reflected in their spiritual and other caregivers?  
  
A panel of program graduates, PAG members, and faculty will reflect on their experiences with unique curricular components. In particular, this workshop will:  
  • Present a patient simulation with multi-cultural cases and actors and preceptors  
  • Outline and connect curricular elements related to Diversity, Clinical Competence and Anti Racism in the context of palliative care.  
  • Illustrate the importance of cultivating philanthropic partnerships so that tuition assistance and stipends can be offered.  
  • Discuss the role of community partnerships for fostering enrollment opportunities for diverse populations in clinical placements  
  • Apply lessons from palliative care specialty CPE to diverse ministerial and counseling settings (i.e. campus, trauma response, hospice)  

Moderators
Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT
Session 3

7:30pm PDT

El Idioma: Dolor y Esperanza/Language: Grief and Hope
With over 50 million Spanish speakers, the United States has the second largest Spanish-speaking population in the world after Mexico, surpassing Spain itself.1  By 2050, the US will surpass Mexico, and become the country with the largest speaking Spanish population in the world.  Yet Spanish-speakers in the US encounter language prejudice and discrimination in the broader culture and unfortunately with more dire consequences in the healthcare setting.  As ACPE Certified Educators, native-Spanish speakers, heritage language speakers, second-language speakers, we want to address the grief and hope that emanates from our experience in the 2021 ACPE National Conference “Creating Room to Breathe”—making room to speak, adding our voice in the midst of malaise, violence, and social fragmentation.    
  
We, the Latinx/Hispanic Spanish-Speaking Community of Practice want to share our expertise based on our collective experience of language discrimination and linguistic bias.  We believe that our experience can help ACPE Educators and ACPE Psychotherapists address the ethnic, racial, cultural differences they encounter with their English-as-a Second-Language students/supervisees.  Consequently, this workshop will:  
  • Present vignettes of personal journeys of Latinx Educators through the ACPE Certification Process.    
  • Outline the emotional and spiritual importance of a persons’ native language,   
  • Illustrate the trauma of segregation or less-than categorization based on English proficiency and accent, and   
  • Propose possible supervisory interventions that would be helpful when working with students/supervisees from this background.    
 

Speakers

Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT

7:30pm PDT

Historic Trauma, Implicit Bias and CPE Strategies in Light of the COVID-19 Pandemic in Native American Communities
The Covid-19 pandemic, state sanctioned violence, and social division have a higher incidence in communities of color. This is true in Native American communities.  The workshop will demonstrate how the higher incidence of Covid-19 virus has affected Native communities in eastern Montana and steps taken to help healthcare providers, in general, and CPE/counseling students, specifically, to better understand this dynamic.  
  
This will be a two-part track workshop, attendance at both sessions is highly recommended. The first presentation will address historical and present-day issues of racism within the Native experience. The second presentation will address the challenges for Clinical Pastoral Education in light of the Covid-19 pandemic in eastern Montana.  
  
The outcomes of the presentations are:    
  • Outline the bi as faced by Native American patients in healthcare settings  
  • Illustrate the disparate impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic in Native American communities in eastern Montana  
  • Demonstrate strategies for educating CPE students and other counseling/care providers on how  to care for persons with Native American religious, cultural, racial/ethnic diversities in Montana in the context of these recent health disparities.   


Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT

7:30pm PDT

In Thought, Word and Deed: Anti-Racism as Spiritual Practice
Just like different forms of racism work in tandem with each other to reinforce racist ideas, behaviors, systems, and policy, anti-racism and the active and conscious effort to dismantle racism also takes many forms. In the midst of its varying forms in contemporary society, what would it be like to frame the work of anti-racism as a daily spiritual practice?   
  
Using clinical case examples and Ibram Kendi’s book, How to be an Anti-Racist as a starting point, this workshop will explore the concept of anti-racism from both a theological and psychological perspective and will frame the work of anti-racism as a daily spiritual discipline. Specifically, this workshop will utilize Cognitive Behavior Theory and Thomistic Theology’s concept of habitus to examine the unconscious, covert, unintentional aspects of racism; consider the relationship between thoughts, behaviors, and emotions in the work of anti-racism; and suggest spiritual practices that cultivate anti-racist lives and identities.   
   
As a result of participating in this workshop, participants will:  
  • Understand the unconscious, covert unintentional aspects of racism  
  • Consider how Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Thomistic Theology’s concept of habitus can be helpful frameworks for understanding and addressing the unconscious, covert, unintentional aspects of racism.  
  • Explore spiritual practices that cultivate anti-racist lives and identities. 

Speakers

Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT

7:30pm PDT

Inhaling our Histories: Exhaling Untruths
Past racial bias in constructing history is examined by a group of women with 2020 vision - looking back at what is recorded in mainline textbooks, examining the current climate, and anticipating future impact.  ACPE has long been aware of the importance of a client’s, counselee’s, patient’s individual \history.  Family systems has helped with understanding the impact of generational transmission, the role of the individual’s extended and ancestral familial history.   
 
This panel will unfold, from their research and experience, the repercussions of one’s cultural history.  These panelists are theologians working as CPE supervisors, ministers, leaders of relief organizations, teaching faculty and one Bishop. They represent Asian-American, Native American, African American, Italian American, and Caucasian American women. The panel draws from their recent collaborative work, Women with 2020 Vision: American Theologians on the Vote, Voice, and Vision of Women (Fortress Press, 2020). Their findings and applications address ethnic/racial/cultural histories that cause us to gasp and gulp for intake of fresh air. 
 
Objectives: 
  • Addressing racial/ethnic/cultural biases in mainline “history” 
  • Connecting these biases to an individual’s psycho-social development 
  • Educating supervisors and mentors about the impact of these historical biases in clinical training 
  • Brainstorming proactively in making our CPE centers  conduits of fresh air 


Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT

7:30pm PDT

Lift Every Voice and Teach: Including African American Voices in CPE Curriculum Development
This workshop will provide Certified Educators, Certified Educator Candidates, and Counselors with personality, theology and education theories that exist beyond traditional, Eurocentric and commonly used theories drawn upon in the training and educational environment.  Attendees will be presented with a vast array of theories, theorists and resources that can be integrated to connect with the African American experience in the education space. 
  
Objectives: 
  • To explore the importance of including African American voices and perspectives in the Clinical Pastoral Education certification process 
  • To present a framework for theology, personality and education theory integration which is rooted in African American voices and perspectives 
  • To provide an inventory of theology, personality and education theories, theorists and resources that reflect African American voices and perspectives 
  
Outcomes:  

Practitioners of Clinical Pastoral Education, Clinical Counseling, Counseling Education, Mental Health Providers and Professional Counselors will: 
  • Gain awareness of the importance of including African American voices and perspectives in the CPE certification process 
  • Have increased knowledge of personality, theology and education theories/theorists that reflect African American voices and perspectives 

Speakers

Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT

7:30pm PDT

Spiritual Care + Domestic Violence + Pandemics: Emerging Insights on Sensitivities to Race, Tradition, and Gender
This workshop will feature film series excerpts from recently released HEALING THE HEALERS Preparing and Supporting Faith Leaders: Domestic Violence, as well as a panel discussion with spiritual care providers featured in, or contributing to, the episodes and accompanying written guides.  Though domestic abuse is not a new topic for mental health and spiritual care professionals, updated multimedia resources for faith leaders with more contemporary sensitivities to race, religious tradition, and gender expression are scarce.  In addition to the COVID-19 dynamics of social and fiscal isolation resulting in compounding pandemics for anyone experiencing domestic violence, what should counselors, clinicians, and caregivers keep in mind when providing care in contexts that attend to spiritual and religious components?

Workshop learning objectives: 

  • Learners will be equipped with emerging, updated tools for anyone providing care and counseling from a faith perspective for victims of domestic violence.  
  • Learners will acquire insights as to common uses and misuses of sacred texts and religious traditions in providing care for victims of domestic violence, including examination of complex issues surrounding gender, power, violence, forgiveness and accountability. 
  • Learners will generate localized, context-sensitive “contact lists”, identifying strengths in gaps in their understanding of how to liaison with appropriate local professionals (law enforcement, domestic violence advocates). 
  • Learners will be equipped with best care practices sensitive to racialized health disparities and the disproportionate impact domestic violence has on communities of color.   

About HEALING THE HEALERS Preparing and Supporting Faith Leaders: Domestic Violence: This timely video series includes 4 episodes of filmed peer-to-peer conversations between faith leaders sensitively navigating the complexities surrounding domestic violence and faith.  Each episode encourages faith leaders and spiritual care providers with strategies for cultivating safe houses of worship and care contexts for victims and survivors, highlighting the dynamics of race, gender, and faith traditions.  Featured faith leaders include survivors of domestic violence, and leaders with experience constructing systemic care solutions for all affected.  A written guide accompanies the series, produced in partnership with leading experts and organizations.  This series brings emerging insights and themed care strategies to every leader, educator or care provider responding to domestic violence.  

Project partners include the FaithTrust Institute, Peaceful Families Project, CONNECT NYC, Soul 2 Soul Sisters, and Safe Haven.  Accompanying written guide includes a diverse array of experts in pastoral care, as well as ACPE Outcomes + APC Competencies tagging, supporting chaplaincy education uses.


Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT

7:30pm PDT

The Role of Chaplains in Liberating Medicine from its Legacy of Systemic Racism in the Era of COVID-19
Systemic Racism and Unconscious Bias are stark realities that impact the spiritual, emotional, psycho-social and physical well-being of ethnic and racial minorities in our society. If the role of the professional chaplain in healthcare settings is to provide support for the spiritual, emotional and social well-being of patients, caregivers and staff as they navigate the healthcare system, then chaplains must be aware of and responsive to the impact of unconscious bias and systemic racism on the communities they serve. The Covid-19 Pandemic and the public outcry for social justice during this Summer’s season of outrage and discontent has exposed the urgency for informed and prepared chaplains to respond.  
  
In 2018, 140 chaplains from across the country participated in a 26 question survey that was designed to gauge their understanding of their role and their preparedness to effectively support minority groups who encounter bias, racism and/or racist systems. Their responses provide a wealth of information and insight into the challenges chaplains confront in fostering supportive environments and undergirding spiritual resiliency.  This workshop incorporates their insights with a comprehensive exploration of the history that informs present day practice and patient experience. It combines historical analysis, thought provoking research and clinical vignettes in an effort to engage and empower chaplains to better serve their patients of color during the Era of Covid-19.  
 

Speakers

Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT

7:30pm PDT

Trauma Informed Spiritual Care:  A Curriculum for Those Caring for First Responders 
This workshop will focus on the curriculum developed for the Baltimore City Police Department Community Chaplains.  It will provide information about the curriculum development process as well as summaries of the educational modules.  Understanding trauma is a key to trauma informed spiritual care, therefore, the workshop will provide information about this theory including childhood trauma, racialized trauma and generational trauma through families and systems.  

Speakers

Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT

7:30pm PDT

Understanding and Working with Race-based Trauma in Counseling and Spiritual Care
Clinical cases and empirical research demonstrate evidence of long-term mental health effects of racism and discrimination (Carter & Sant-Baret, 2015;  ). Known by several names--cultural, historical, intergeneration, and transgenerational trauma—the exact meaning of these terms and presumed mechanisms of transmission differ. The terms and mechanisms will be examined in light of research on trauma among Comfort Women in Korea, post-Apartheid South Africa, Native Americans, Cambodians, and African Americans. Practical applications of existing measurements of race-based trauma and evidence-based trauma-informed therapeutic techniques will be explored for clinicians, especially spiritually integrated psychotherapy and spiritual care. Particular attention will be paid to the experiences of people of color who experience the effects of both historical trauma and ongoing racism.  

An abundance of research suggests that while negative symptoms of trauma such as PTSD are real, enduring extreme stress and moving through extreme stress can have positive psychological consequences that are also real. The most widely recognized term used to describe the phenomena is posttraumatic growth (PTG; Calhoun & Tedeschi, 2006), with other terms such as stress-related growth (SRG; Parks, 2002) also used to describe the process. The PTG literature highlights that the act of enduring stress or trauma can set a person on a quest for meaning that encourages a major reconstruction of her global assumptions. This can result in the transformation of a person’s experience of herself, others, or the world. There is limited research emerging in the area of race-based trauma, posttraumatic growth, and resilience. This research and clinical examples will be explored with participants.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and distinguish types of cross-generational traumatic symptoms.
  • Summarize proposed mechanisms of cross-generational trauma
  • Locate and apply race-based stress symptom assessments and techniques in clinical settings
  • Recognize evidence of resiliency and Post-traumatic Growth despite ongoing interpersonal and institutional racism.


Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT

7:30pm PDT

Womanist Approaches to Decolonizing Practices of Care
Participants will engage womanist approaches to theologies and practices of care and counseling in light of their decolonial aims.  The workshop format will be didactic and participatory. We will focus our attention on the development of three capacities necessary for undertaking decolonial cares:
  • Defining womanist approaches to care
  • Articulating their decolonial aims
  • Examining 3 examples of womanist approaches to decolonizing care from different care contexts

Participants will be able to 
  • Define womanist care and counseling in terms of theological, culture analyses, and practice aims
  • Articulate criteria for a womanist decolonial approach to defining and practicing care and counseling
  • Critically evaluate practices of care from a womanist decolonial perspective
  • Critical analyze theologies of care and counseling in relation to decolonial commitments.

Speakers

Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT

7:30pm PDT

“Let America Be American Again”: Exploring the Relationship between Psychological Ambivalence and Social Oppression
Strictly defined, ambivalence refers to the simultaneous existence of contradictory feelings and attitudes toward a person, object, event, situation or the self. From a psychological perspective, unresolved ambivalence can result in crucial elements of the self being relegated indefinitely to the status of unheard through ongoing cognitive, emotional, and spiritual repression. On a larger scale, the struggles of ideological ambivalence and social oppression echo these psychological conflicts.  
  
This workshop offers a reading of Langston Hughes 1936 poem, “Let America Be America Again” as a framework through which the relationship between social and psychological ambivalence can be explored. By understanding the unheard in Hughes’s poem as parenthetical voices rather than conflicting ideological evaluations, we can allow space for the unheard to exist as both individual psychological manifestations and collective social manifestations. Within this framework, not only are we able to draw connections between microcosmic and macrocosmic occurrences of ambivalence, but begin to understand these more universally - not as isolated instances of cognitive and social conflict, but rather as individual and communal bodies sharing experiences of ongoing oppression within systems of neurological and political power.  
  
 Learning Objectives  
  • Examine modern psychological definitions of ambivalence  
  • Consider ambivalence as oppression of the unheard rather than the conflict of opposites.  
  • Recognize that ambivalence as oppression exists in both psychological and social bodies.  
  • Establish a therapeutic framework that addresses the psychological, spiritual, and social aspects of ambivalence.  
  • Provide resources for further learning on Liberation Psychology, oppression, and systems of power.  

Speakers

Tuesday May 11, 2021 7:30pm - 9:00pm PDT
 
Friday, May 14
 

11:30am PDT

Caring for the Souls of Black Folk: Narrative Spirituality and Care As a Response to Racial Trauma
The objective of this workshop is to explore with participants how narrative can be used as a tool of listening to, learning about and creating new narratives of care, counseling, connection and community across difference. As a result of participation in this workshop, participants will understand the importance of learning about the story of those who they care for with the understanding that when we learn more fully about each other’s story and the fuller story of our nation, we can reframe our own understanding and bias leading to a better community founded on collaboration and cross racial dialogue and care. 
 
As a result of this workshop, participants will: 
  • Learn about the history of American race relations and its impact on the racial trauma of black  
people.  
  • Examine the legacy of racial narratives and biases in race relations.  
  • Engage narrative and story as a tool of cross-cultural spiritual care and counseling. 
  • Explore the concept of re-storying and the role it can play in reshaping race relations. 
  • Be introduced to practices of “Re-story” as a tool to help transform the dominant narratives that  
     shape their own practices of spiritual care and counseling.  

 

Speakers

Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT
Session 4

11:30am PDT

El Idioma: Dolor y Esperanza/Language: Grief and Hope
With over 50 million Spanish speakers, the United States has the second largest Spanish-speaking population in the world after Mexico, surpassing Spain itself.1  By 2050, the US will surpass Mexico, and become the country with the largest speaking Spanish population in the world.  Yet Spanish-speakers in the US encounter language prejudice and discrimination in the broader culture and unfortunately with more dire consequences in the healthcare setting.  As ACPE Certified Educators, native-Spanish speakers, heritage language speakers, second-language speakers, we want to address the grief and hope that emanates from our experience in the 2021 ACPE National Conference “Creating Room to Breathe”—making room to speak, adding our voice in the midst of malaise, violence, and social fragmentation.    
  
We, the Latinx/Hispanic Spanish-Speaking Community of Practice want to share our expertise based on our collective experience of language discrimination and linguistic bias.  We believe that our experience can help ACPE Educators and ACPE Psychotherapists address the ethnic, racial, cultural differences they encounter with their English-as-a Second-Language students/supervisees.  Consequently, this workshop will:  
  • Present vignettes of personal journeys of Latinx Educators through the ACPE Certification Process.    
  • Outline the emotional and spiritual importance of a persons’ native language,   
  • Illustrate the trauma of segregation or less-than categorization based on English proficiency and accent, and   
  • Propose possible supervisory interventions that would be helpful when working with students/supervisees from this background.    
 

Speakers

Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT

11:30am PDT

In Thought, Word and Deed: Anti-Racism as Spiritual Practice
Just like different forms of racism work in tandem with each other to reinforce racist ideas, behaviors, systems, and policy, anti-racism and the active and conscious effort to dismantle racism also takes many forms. In the midst of its varying forms in contemporary society, what would it be like to frame the work of anti-racism as a daily spiritual practice?   
  
Using clinical case examples and Ibram Kendi’s book, How to be an Anti-Racist as a starting point, this workshop will explore the concept of anti-racism from both a theological and psychological perspective and will frame the work of anti-racism as a daily spiritual discipline. Specifically, this workshop will utilize Cognitive Behavior Theory and Thomistic Theology’s concept of habitus to examine the unconscious, covert, unintentional aspects of racism; consider the relationship between thoughts, behaviors, and emotions in the work of anti-racism; and suggest spiritual practices that cultivate anti-racist lives and identities.   
   
As a result of participating in this workshop, participants will:  
  • Understand the unconscious, covert unintentional aspects of racism  
  • Consider how Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Thomistic Theology’s concept of habitus can be helpful frameworks for understanding and addressing the unconscious, covert, unintentional aspects of racism.  
  • Explore spiritual practices that cultivate anti-racist lives and identities. 

Speakers

Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT

11:30am PDT

Korean American Experiences of Clinical Pastoral Education: Challenges, Discoveries and Visions
The theme of 2021 ACPE Conference is, “Creating Room to Breathe: Spiritual Education amid Sickness, State-Sanctioned Violence and Social Division.” In response to this theme, a group of Korean American pastoral theologians, CPE students and Certified Educators want to create a space in which we can reflect on the unique Korean American experiences of CPE, and share one’s wisdom and insights with one another, and envision what we can offer to our patients, colleagues and communities. We hope that it will be a beginning of Korean American CPE movements within ACPE, which will enrich its diversity. We invite anyone who is interested in the Korean American experiences of CPE to join us for an open conversation. 


Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT

11:30am PDT

Lift Every Voice and Teach: Including African American Voices in CPE Curriculum Development
This workshop will provide Certified Educators, Certified Educator Candidates, and Counselors with personality, theology and education theories that exist beyond traditional, Eurocentric and commonly used theories drawn upon in the training and educational environment.  Attendees will be presented with a vast array of theories, theorists and resources that can be integrated to connect with the African American experience in the education space. 
  
Objectives: 
  • To explore the importance of including African American voices and perspectives in the Clinical Pastoral Education certification process 
  • To present a framework for theology, personality and education theory integration which is rooted in African American voices and perspectives 
  • To provide an inventory of theology, personality and education theories, theorists and resources that reflect African American voices and perspectives 
  
Outcomes:  

Practitioners of Clinical Pastoral Education, Clinical Counseling, Counseling Education, Mental Health Providers and Professional Counselors will: 
  • Gain awareness of the importance of including African American voices and perspectives in the CPE certification process 
  • Have increased knowledge of personality, theology and education theories/theorists that reflect African American voices and perspectives 

Speakers

Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT

11:30am PDT

Reviving the Breath of Life: The Lament as Restorative Therapy
Authentic self-identity has been compromised in the psyche of Black people in America. The denigrating effects of stigmatizing responses and internalized biases have deposited ideas of shame and belittling self-concepts within the consciousness of Black people. These negative self-perceptions have hindered the development of authentic Black selfhood and require attention, so that these individuals can be liberated from the oppressive existence and realize restoration to genuine expression as a viable living soul. 

This workshop invites participants to consider the mental health concerns of those in the Black community and seeks to outline ways to assist individuals who experience the negative impact of these internalized faulty self-perceptions.  In particular, the biblical concept of lament will be introduced as a pathway to discover and grieve the hindering self-perceptions that exist in the psyche of Black people. Through lecture, role plays, and small group discussion this workshop will: 
  • Demonstrate the necessity of lamenting the customarily injurious, invalidating, and discriminatory environments and treatment of Black people 
  • Outline the literary structure of biblical lament and utilize it as a means of creating resistance, strength, support, and new possibilities in the minds, souls, and lives of Black people. 
  • Explore the ways in which implicit and explicit bias impacts the care and mental health treatment of Black people. 
  • Invite and encourage participants to cultivate an empathic presence for those seeking liberation from oppressive structures.  


Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT

11:30am PDT

Spiritual Care + Domestic Violence + Pandemics: Emerging Insights on Sensitivities to Race, Tradition, and Gender
This workshop will feature film series excerpts from recently released HEALING THE HEALERS Preparing and Supporting Faith Leaders: Domestic Violence, as well as a panel discussion with spiritual care providers featured in, or contributing to, the episodes and accompanying written guides.  Though domestic abuse is not a new topic for mental health and spiritual care professionals, updated multimedia resources for faith leaders with more contemporary sensitivities to race, religious tradition, and gender expression are scarce.  In addition to the COVID-19 dynamics of social and fiscal isolation resulting in compounding pandemics for anyone experiencing domestic violence, what should counselors, clinicians, and caregivers keep in mind when providing care in contexts that attend to spiritual and religious components?

Workshop learning objectives: 

  • Learners will be equipped with emerging, updated tools for anyone providing care and counseling from a faith perspective for victims of domestic violence.  
  • Learners will acquire insights as to common uses and misuses of sacred texts and religious traditions in providing care for victims of domestic violence, including examination of complex issues surrounding gender, power, violence, forgiveness and accountability. 
  • Learners will generate localized, context-sensitive “contact lists”, identifying strengths in gaps in their understanding of how to liaison with appropriate local professionals (law enforcement, domestic violence advocates). 
  • Learners will be equipped with best care practices sensitive to racialized health disparities and the disproportionate impact domestic violence has on communities of color.   

About HEALING THE HEALERS Preparing and Supporting Faith Leaders: Domestic Violence: This timely video series includes 4 episodes of filmed peer-to-peer conversations between faith leaders sensitively navigating the complexities surrounding domestic violence and faith.  Each episode encourages faith leaders and spiritual care providers with strategies for cultivating safe houses of worship and care contexts for victims and survivors, highlighting the dynamics of race, gender, and faith traditions.  Featured faith leaders include survivors of domestic violence, and leaders with experience constructing systemic care solutions for all affected.  A written guide accompanies the series, produced in partnership with leading experts and organizations.  This series brings emerging insights and themed care strategies to every leader, educator or care provider responding to domestic violence.  

Project partners include the FaithTrust Institute, Peaceful Families Project, CONNECT NYC, Soul 2 Soul Sisters, and Safe Haven.  Accompanying written guide includes a diverse array of experts in pastoral care, as well as ACPE Outcomes + APC Competencies tagging, supporting chaplaincy education uses.


Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT

11:30am PDT

The Culture of Spirituality and Religion
Spirituality and Religion have long been a hot topic in society. The means upon which a person identifies whether they are spiritual and not religious or vice versa, can take on a conversation of its own. In the midst of these colorful and sacred dialogues is the reality that both spirituality and religion encompasses culture. In the oracles of one’s head and heart resides a culture of beliefs, practices, literature, and experiences that shape the awareness and spiritual understanding of each individual. This session will invite participants to discuss and explore the diverse cultural implications of spirituality and religion to cultivate equitable and ecumenical communal relationships.   


Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT

11:30am PDT

The Role of Chaplains in Liberating Medicine from its Legacy of Systemic Racism in the Era of COVID-19
Systemic Racism and Unconscious Bias are stark realities that impact the spiritual, emotional, psycho-social and physical well-being of ethnic and racial minorities in our society. If the role of the professional chaplain in healthcare settings is to provide support for the spiritual, emotional and social well-being of patients, caregivers and staff as they navigate the healthcare system, then chaplains must be aware of and responsive to the impact of unconscious bias and systemic racism on the communities they serve. The Covid-19 Pandemic and the public outcry for social justice during this Summer’s season of outrage and discontent has exposed the urgency for informed and prepared chaplains to respond.  
  
In 2018, 140 chaplains from across the country participated in a 26 question survey that was designed to gauge their understanding of their role and their preparedness to effectively support minority groups who encounter bias, racism and/or racist systems. Their responses provide a wealth of information and insight into the challenges chaplains confront in fostering supportive environments and undergirding spiritual resiliency.  This workshop incorporates their insights with a comprehensive exploration of the history that informs present day practice and patient experience. It combines historical analysis, thought provoking research and clinical vignettes in an effort to engage and empower chaplains to better serve their patients of color during the Era of Covid-19.  
 

Speakers

Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT

11:30am PDT

Trauma Informed Spiritual Care:  A Curriculum for Those Caring for First Responders 
This workshop will focus on the curriculum developed for the Baltimore City Police Department Community Chaplains.  It will provide information about the curriculum development process as well as summaries of the educational modules.  Understanding trauma is a key to trauma informed spiritual care, therefore, the workshop will provide information about this theory including childhood trauma, racialized trauma and generational trauma through families and systems.  

Speakers

Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT

11:30am PDT

Understanding and Working with Race-based Trauma in Counseling and Spiritual Care
Clinical cases and empirical research demonstrate evidence of long-term mental health effects of racism and discrimination (Carter & Sant-Baret, 2015;  ). Known by several names--cultural, historical, intergeneration, and transgenerational trauma—the exact meaning of these terms and presumed mechanisms of transmission differ. The terms and mechanisms will be examined in light of research on trauma among Comfort Women in Korea, post-Apartheid South Africa, Native Americans, Cambodians, and African Americans. Practical applications of existing measurements of race-based trauma and evidence-based trauma-informed therapeutic techniques will be explored for clinicians, especially spiritually integrated psychotherapy and spiritual care. Particular attention will be paid to the experiences of people of color who experience the effects of both historical trauma and ongoing racism.  

An abundance of research suggests that while negative symptoms of trauma such as PTSD are real, enduring extreme stress and moving through extreme stress can have positive psychological consequences that are also real. The most widely recognized term used to describe the phenomena is posttraumatic growth (PTG; Calhoun & Tedeschi, 2006), with other terms such as stress-related growth (SRG; Parks, 2002) also used to describe the process. The PTG literature highlights that the act of enduring stress or trauma can set a person on a quest for meaning that encourages a major reconstruction of her global assumptions. This can result in the transformation of a person’s experience of herself, others, or the world. There is limited research emerging in the area of race-based trauma, posttraumatic growth, and resilience. This research and clinical examples will be explored with participants.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and distinguish types of cross-generational traumatic symptoms.
  • Summarize proposed mechanisms of cross-generational trauma
  • Locate and apply race-based stress symptom assessments and techniques in clinical settings
  • Recognize evidence of resiliency and Post-traumatic Growth despite ongoing interpersonal and institutional racism.


Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT

11:30am PDT

Womanist Approaches to Decolonizing Practices of Care
Participants will engage womanist approaches to theologies and practices of care and counseling in light of their decolonial aims.  The workshop format will be didactic and participatory. We will focus our attention on the development of three capacities necessary for undertaking decolonial cares:
  • Defining womanist approaches to care
  • Articulating their decolonial aims
  • Examining 3 examples of womanist approaches to decolonizing care from different care contexts

Participants will be able to 
  • Define womanist care and counseling in terms of theological, culture analyses, and practice aims
  • Articulate criteria for a womanist decolonial approach to defining and practicing care and counseling
  • Critically evaluate practices of care from a womanist decolonial perspective
  • Critical analyze theologies of care and counseling in relation to decolonial commitments.

Speakers

Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT

11:30am PDT

“Let America Be American Again”: Exploring the Relationship between Psychological Ambivalence and Social Oppression
Strictly defined, ambivalence refers to the simultaneous existence of contradictory feelings and attitudes toward a person, object, event, situation or the self. From a psychological perspective, unresolved ambivalence can result in crucial elements of the self being relegated indefinitely to the status of unheard through ongoing cognitive, emotional, and spiritual repression. On a larger scale, the struggles of ideological ambivalence and social oppression echo these psychological conflicts.  
  
This workshop offers a reading of Langston Hughes 1936 poem, “Let America Be America Again” as a framework through which the relationship between social and psychological ambivalence can be explored. By understanding the unheard in Hughes’s poem as parenthetical voices rather than conflicting ideological evaluations, we can allow space for the unheard to exist as both individual psychological manifestations and collective social manifestations. Within this framework, not only are we able to draw connections between microcosmic and macrocosmic occurrences of ambivalence, but begin to understand these more universally - not as isolated instances of cognitive and social conflict, but rather as individual and communal bodies sharing experiences of ongoing oppression within systems of neurological and political power.  
  
 Learning Objectives  
  • Examine modern psychological definitions of ambivalence  
  • Consider ambivalence as oppression of the unheard rather than the conflict of opposites.  
  • Recognize that ambivalence as oppression exists in both psychological and social bodies.  
  • Establish a therapeutic framework that addresses the psychological, spiritual, and social aspects of ambivalence.  
  • Provide resources for further learning on Liberation Psychology, oppression, and systems of power.  

Speakers

Friday May 14, 2021 11:30am - 1:00pm PDT
 
Thursday, May 20
 

3:30pm PDT

Beyond White Privilege – Empathy and Understanding
The brutal killing of George Floyd, coupled with the recent invasion of the Capital building by Trump supporters, has forced many white Americans to be conscious of stark disparities in racial justice for the first time.  How could we white Americans be so clueless for so long? What social structures have kept many of us cocooned in ignorance while our fellow Black, Brown, Asian, Moslem and Indian neighbors suffered? What is it about white privilege that prevents us from seeing what is right before our eyes?  
 
Beginning with my own story of moving from ignorance to dawning awareness as a middle-class white woman, I will invite my fellow white Americans to consider the ways that white Americans have historically participated in “blaming the victim”, beginning with the genocide of Indigenous peoples and the subjugation of Black Americans through chattel slavery.  
 
Workshop participants will be invited to consider these questions: How do we move beyond guilt and superficial solidarity to meaningful action for social justice? How do we reach out to our white brothers and sisters who may still be Trump supporters or at least not “woke”?  How do we continue to educate ourselves to prepare for the day when America’s color line while be erased once and for all? What do #BlackLivesMatter, #MeToo and other movements for social justice have in common? How can we best promote empathy for “the other” – those unlike us?  


Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
Session 5

3:30pm PDT

Caring for the Souls of Black Folk: Narrative Spirituality and Care As a Response to Racial Trauma
The objective of this workshop is to explore with participants how narrative can be used as a tool of listening to, learning about and creating new narratives of care, counseling, connection and community across difference. As a result of participation in this workshop, participants will understand the importance of learning about the story of those who they care for with the understanding that when we learn more fully about each other’s story and the fuller story of our nation, we can reframe our own understanding and bias leading to a better community founded on collaboration and cross racial dialogue and care. 
 
As a result of this workshop, participants will: 
  • Learn about the history of American race relations and its impact on the racial trauma of black  
people.  
  • Examine the legacy of racial narratives and biases in race relations.  
  • Engage narrative and story as a tool of cross-cultural spiritual care and counseling. 
  • Explore the concept of re-storying and the role it can play in reshaping race relations. 
  • Be introduced to practices of “Re-story” as a tool to help transform the dominant narratives that  
     shape their own practices of spiritual care and counseling.  

 

Speakers

Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

El Idioma: Dolor y Esperanza/Language: Grief and Hope
With over 50 million Spanish speakers, the United States has the second largest Spanish-speaking population in the world after Mexico, surpassing Spain itself.1  By 2050, the US will surpass Mexico, and become the country with the largest speaking Spanish population in the world.  Yet Spanish-speakers in the US encounter language prejudice and discrimination in the broader culture and unfortunately with more dire consequences in the healthcare setting.  As ACPE Certified Educators, native-Spanish speakers, heritage language speakers, second-language speakers, we want to address the grief and hope that emanates from our experience in the 2021 ACPE National Conference “Creating Room to Breathe”—making room to speak, adding our voice in the midst of malaise, violence, and social fragmentation.    
  
We, the Latinx/Hispanic Spanish-Speaking Community of Practice want to share our expertise based on our collective experience of language discrimination and linguistic bias.  We believe that our experience can help ACPE Educators and ACPE Psychotherapists address the ethnic, racial, cultural differences they encounter with their English-as-a Second-Language students/supervisees.  Consequently, this workshop will:  
  • Present vignettes of personal journeys of Latinx Educators through the ACPE Certification Process.    
  • Outline the emotional and spiritual importance of a persons’ native language,   
  • Illustrate the trauma of segregation or less-than categorization based on English proficiency and accent, and   
  • Propose possible supervisory interventions that would be helpful when working with students/supervisees from this background.    
 

Speakers

Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

In Thought, Word and Deed: Anti-Racism as Spiritual Practice
Just like different forms of racism work in tandem with each other to reinforce racist ideas, behaviors, systems, and policy, anti-racism and the active and conscious effort to dismantle racism also takes many forms. In the midst of its varying forms in contemporary society, what would it be like to frame the work of anti-racism as a daily spiritual practice?   
  
Using clinical case examples and Ibram Kendi’s book, How to be an Anti-Racist as a starting point, this workshop will explore the concept of anti-racism from both a theological and psychological perspective and will frame the work of anti-racism as a daily spiritual discipline. Specifically, this workshop will utilize Cognitive Behavior Theory and Thomistic Theology’s concept of habitus to examine the unconscious, covert, unintentional aspects of racism; consider the relationship between thoughts, behaviors, and emotions in the work of anti-racism; and suggest spiritual practices that cultivate anti-racist lives and identities.   
   
As a result of participating in this workshop, participants will:  
  • Understand the unconscious, covert unintentional aspects of racism  
  • Consider how Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Thomistic Theology’s concept of habitus can be helpful frameworks for understanding and addressing the unconscious, covert, unintentional aspects of racism.  
  • Explore spiritual practices that cultivate anti-racist lives and identities. 

Speakers

Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Inhaling our Histories: Exhaling Untruths
Past racial bias in constructing history is examined by a group of women with 2020 vision - looking back at what is recorded in mainline textbooks, examining the current climate, and anticipating future impact.  ACPE has long been aware of the importance of a client’s, counselee’s, patient’s individual \history.  Family systems has helped with understanding the impact of generational transmission, the role of the individual’s extended and ancestral familial history.   
 
This panel will unfold, from their research and experience, the repercussions of one’s cultural history.  These panelists are theologians working as CPE supervisors, ministers, leaders of relief organizations, teaching faculty and one Bishop. They represent Asian-American, Native American, African American, Italian American, and Caucasian American women. The panel draws from their recent collaborative work, Women with 2020 Vision: American Theologians on the Vote, Voice, and Vision of Women (Fortress Press, 2020). Their findings and applications address ethnic/racial/cultural histories that cause us to gasp and gulp for intake of fresh air. 
 
Objectives: 
  • Addressing racial/ethnic/cultural biases in mainline “history” 
  • Connecting these biases to an individual’s psycho-social development 
  • Educating supervisors and mentors about the impact of these historical biases in clinical training 
  • Brainstorming proactively in making our CPE centers  conduits of fresh air 


Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Lift Every Voice and Teach: Including African American Voices in CPE Curriculum Development
This workshop will provide Certified Educators, Certified Educator Candidates, and Counselors with personality, theology and education theories that exist beyond traditional, Eurocentric and commonly used theories drawn upon in the training and educational environment.  Attendees will be presented with a vast array of theories, theorists and resources that can be integrated to connect with the African American experience in the education space. 
  
Objectives: 
  • To explore the importance of including African American voices and perspectives in the Clinical Pastoral Education certification process 
  • To present a framework for theology, personality and education theory integration which is rooted in African American voices and perspectives 
  • To provide an inventory of theology, personality and education theories, theorists and resources that reflect African American voices and perspectives 
  
Outcomes:  

Practitioners of Clinical Pastoral Education, Clinical Counseling, Counseling Education, Mental Health Providers and Professional Counselors will: 
  • Gain awareness of the importance of including African American voices and perspectives in the CPE certification process 
  • Have increased knowledge of personality, theology and education theories/theorists that reflect African American voices and perspectives 

Speakers

Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Reviving the Breath of Life: The Lament as Restorative Therapy
Authentic self-identity has been compromised in the psyche of Black people in America. The denigrating effects of stigmatizing responses and internalized biases have deposited ideas of shame and belittling self-concepts within the consciousness of Black people. These negative self-perceptions have hindered the development of authentic Black selfhood and require attention, so that these individuals can be liberated from the oppressive existence and realize restoration to genuine expression as a viable living soul. 

This workshop invites participants to consider the mental health concerns of those in the Black community and seeks to outline ways to assist individuals who experience the negative impact of these internalized faulty self-perceptions.  In particular, the biblical concept of lament will be introduced as a pathway to discover and grieve the hindering self-perceptions that exist in the psyche of Black people. Through lecture, role plays, and small group discussion this workshop will: 
  • Demonstrate the necessity of lamenting the customarily injurious, invalidating, and discriminatory environments and treatment of Black people 
  • Outline the literary structure of biblical lament and utilize it as a means of creating resistance, strength, support, and new possibilities in the minds, souls, and lives of Black people. 
  • Explore the ways in which implicit and explicit bias impacts the care and mental health treatment of Black people. 
  • Invite and encourage participants to cultivate an empathic presence for those seeking liberation from oppressive structures.  


Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Spiritual Care + Domestic Violence + Pandemics: Emerging Insights on Sensitivities to Race, Tradition, and Gender
This workshop will feature film series excerpts from recently released HEALING THE HEALERS Preparing and Supporting Faith Leaders: Domestic Violence, as well as a panel discussion with spiritual care providers featured in, or contributing to, the episodes and accompanying written guides.  Though domestic abuse is not a new topic for mental health and spiritual care professionals, updated multimedia resources for faith leaders with more contemporary sensitivities to race, religious tradition, and gender expression are scarce.  In addition to the COVID-19 dynamics of social and fiscal isolation resulting in compounding pandemics for anyone experiencing domestic violence, what should counselors, clinicians, and caregivers keep in mind when providing care in contexts that attend to spiritual and religious components?

Workshop learning objectives: 

  • Learners will be equipped with emerging, updated tools for anyone providing care and counseling from a faith perspective for victims of domestic violence.  
  • Learners will acquire insights as to common uses and misuses of sacred texts and religious traditions in providing care for victims of domestic violence, including examination of complex issues surrounding gender, power, violence, forgiveness and accountability. 
  • Learners will generate localized, context-sensitive “contact lists”, identifying strengths in gaps in their understanding of how to liaison with appropriate local professionals (law enforcement, domestic violence advocates). 
  • Learners will be equipped with best care practices sensitive to racialized health disparities and the disproportionate impact domestic violence has on communities of color.   

About HEALING THE HEALERS Preparing and Supporting Faith Leaders: Domestic Violence: This timely video series includes 4 episodes of filmed peer-to-peer conversations between faith leaders sensitively navigating the complexities surrounding domestic violence and faith.  Each episode encourages faith leaders and spiritual care providers with strategies for cultivating safe houses of worship and care contexts for victims and survivors, highlighting the dynamics of race, gender, and faith traditions.  Featured faith leaders include survivors of domestic violence, and leaders with experience constructing systemic care solutions for all affected.  A written guide accompanies the series, produced in partnership with leading experts and organizations.  This series brings emerging insights and themed care strategies to every leader, educator or care provider responding to domestic violence.  

Project partners include the FaithTrust Institute, Peaceful Families Project, CONNECT NYC, Soul 2 Soul Sisters, and Safe Haven.  Accompanying written guide includes a diverse array of experts in pastoral care, as well as ACPE Outcomes + APC Competencies tagging, supporting chaplaincy education uses.


Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Trauma Informed Spiritual Care:  A Curriculum for Those Caring for First Responders 
This workshop will focus on the curriculum developed for the Baltimore City Police Department Community Chaplains.  It will provide information about the curriculum development process as well as summaries of the educational modules.  Understanding trauma is a key to trauma informed spiritual care, therefore, the workshop will provide information about this theory including childhood trauma, racialized trauma and generational trauma through families and systems.  

Speakers

Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Trauma, Racism, Arts and Supervision
“Trauma” is used to refer to the emotional effects of potentially overwhelming events like a natural disaster, institutional violence, longstanding racial wounds, death, severe accidents, or rape. Experiencing a high number of early “adverse childhood experiences” (ACE Score) has been firmly and repeatedly tied to bad health, to shortened lifespan and to barriers to learning.  ACE disproportionally affect BIPOC and the LGBTQ community, and these experiences perpetuate emotional and spiritual trauma.   

Resiliency is the ability to bounce back and recover from stressors, ACE and trauma. Spiritually integrated arts practices are a core intervention on behalf of anti racist resiliency.  CPE Supervision, as a relationship that addresses identity, self awareness and relationship, is ripe for re traumatization and for healing. 

The objectives for this workshop are:  

  • To introduce a modest beginning for thinking about the intersection between trauma, racism, clinical education and arts practices for spiritual care providers.  
  • To explore ways that the arts could be part of clinical education with the lenses of theory and practice from trauma, racism, resilience and expressive arts.  
  • To engage one another about the experience and practice of antiracist resiliency arts based practices in clinical education.
  •    To provide a liminal space for experimentation and new ideas about the edge of the unknown between these fields.   

Speakers

Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Understanding and Working with Race-based Trauma in Counseling and Spiritual Care
Clinical cases and empirical research demonstrate evidence of long-term mental health effects of racism and discrimination (Carter & Sant-Baret, 2015;  ). Known by several names--cultural, historical, intergeneration, and transgenerational trauma—the exact meaning of these terms and presumed mechanisms of transmission differ. The terms and mechanisms will be examined in light of research on trauma among Comfort Women in Korea, post-Apartheid South Africa, Native Americans, Cambodians, and African Americans. Practical applications of existing measurements of race-based trauma and evidence-based trauma-informed therapeutic techniques will be explored for clinicians, especially spiritually integrated psychotherapy and spiritual care. Particular attention will be paid to the experiences of people of color who experience the effects of both historical trauma and ongoing racism.  

An abundance of research suggests that while negative symptoms of trauma such as PTSD are real, enduring extreme stress and moving through extreme stress can have positive psychological consequences that are also real. The most widely recognized term used to describe the phenomena is posttraumatic growth (PTG; Calhoun & Tedeschi, 2006), with other terms such as stress-related growth (SRG; Parks, 2002) also used to describe the process. The PTG literature highlights that the act of enduring stress or trauma can set a person on a quest for meaning that encourages a major reconstruction of her global assumptions. This can result in the transformation of a person’s experience of herself, others, or the world. There is limited research emerging in the area of race-based trauma, posttraumatic growth, and resilience. This research and clinical examples will be explored with participants.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and distinguish types of cross-generational traumatic symptoms.
  • Summarize proposed mechanisms of cross-generational trauma
  • Locate and apply race-based stress symptom assessments and techniques in clinical settings
  • Recognize evidence of resiliency and Post-traumatic Growth despite ongoing interpersonal and institutional racism.


Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

Womanist Approaches to Decolonizing Practices of Care
Participants will engage womanist approaches to theologies and practices of care and counseling in light of their decolonial aims.  The workshop format will be didactic and participatory. We will focus our attention on the development of three capacities necessary for undertaking decolonial cares:
  • Defining womanist approaches to care
  • Articulating their decolonial aims
  • Examining 3 examples of womanist approaches to decolonizing care from different care contexts

Participants will be able to 
  • Define womanist care and counseling in terms of theological, culture analyses, and practice aims
  • Articulate criteria for a womanist decolonial approach to defining and practicing care and counseling
  • Critically evaluate practices of care from a womanist decolonial perspective
  • Critical analyze theologies of care and counseling in relation to decolonial commitments.

Speakers

Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT

3:30pm PDT

“Let America Be American Again”: Exploring the Relationship between Psychological Ambivalence and Social Oppression
Strictly defined, ambivalence refers to the simultaneous existence of contradictory feelings and attitudes toward a person, object, event, situation or the self. From a psychological perspective, unresolved ambivalence can result in crucial elements of the self being relegated indefinitely to the status of unheard through ongoing cognitive, emotional, and spiritual repression. On a larger scale, the struggles of ideological ambivalence and social oppression echo these psychological conflicts.  
  
This workshop offers a reading of Langston Hughes 1936 poem, “Let America Be America Again” as a framework through which the relationship between social and psychological ambivalence can be explored. By understanding the unheard in Hughes’s poem as parenthetical voices rather than conflicting ideological evaluations, we can allow space for the unheard to exist as both individual psychological manifestations and collective social manifestations. Within this framework, not only are we able to draw connections between microcosmic and macrocosmic occurrences of ambivalence, but begin to understand these more universally - not as isolated instances of cognitive and social conflict, but rather as individual and communal bodies sharing experiences of ongoing oppression within systems of neurological and political power.  
  
 Learning Objectives  
  • Examine modern psychological definitions of ambivalence  
  • Consider ambivalence as oppression of the unheard rather than the conflict of opposites.  
  • Recognize that ambivalence as oppression exists in both psychological and social bodies.  
  • Establish a therapeutic framework that addresses the psychological, spiritual, and social aspects of ambivalence.  
  • Provide resources for further learning on Liberation Psychology, oppression, and systems of power.  

Speakers

Thursday May 20, 2021 3:30pm - 5:00pm PDT
 
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